Welding for a beginner advice

A place to chat/ ask about tool, fitting out your workshop etc etc
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lardmarc
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Location: Newton Abbot

Re: Welding for a beginner advice

Post by lardmarc » Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:10 am

Minter wrote: ↑
Mon Sep 17, 2018 7:46 am
Mr Shiney is quiet!
First time for everything.
1 x
“Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.” (Adams, 2009).

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mt bandit
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Location: kent

Re: Welding for a beginner advice

Post by mt bandit » Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:02 pm

lardmarc wrote: ↑
Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:10 am
Minter wrote: ↑
Mon Sep 17, 2018 7:46 am
Mr Shiney is quiet!
First time for everything.
Maybe he's doing a welding course
1 x
Armstrong 600
500 outfit

Mr Shiney

Re: Welding for a beginner advice

Post by Mr Shiney » Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:35 pm

Nah, the great Arceye has spoken. Nothing further for me to add and why pat a dog that will just bite your hand....... ;)
0 x

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Bonnielad
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Re: Welding for a beginner advice

Post by Bonnielad » Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:44 pm

It doesn't matter what anyone says at the moment, Ian has gone internet cold turkey for a week. Hope he's not suffering withdrawals!
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1985 Armstrong MT500 ('Modernised') now L.R. Green.
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Kim Thomas
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Location: London

Re: Welding for a beginner advice

Post by Kim Thomas » Mon Aug 02, 2021 2:44 pm

FordPrefect wrote: ↑
Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:43 pm
I would agree with the advice to take a short course in welding if you can. Then once you're set up with a welder let out your inner skip rat and scrounge up as lots of scrap bits of mild steel, clean them up with an angle grinder and set about practicing. You don't need to be coded to weld bits up for use at home or on the bike as you can usually manipulate whatever your welding so it's always flat. I'm not a professional welder but, I did do an NVQ level 2 in fabrication and welding some years back and I'm called on to weld stuff up at work fairly often. Once you get a feel for it, it's not that hard at least not the kind of things you'll want to be doing. If you get a chance to do TIG welding, jump at it. I've done MIG, TIG and stick (MMA) and I've always far prefered the stick and TIG, the latter is bloody handy for thin metal like exhausts.
This is something i have been thinking about to learn also. As far i have been able to glean from YouTube, each system has pro's and cons. It depends on what you want to do, and where you want to dot it. (i think if most of your welding is outside stick is the preferred method) and how thick the metal is you want to weld....

But hey I've never done welding, so what do i know?
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If you don't know, ask the MTRC Forum! :?
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